Farm 432 - Insect Breeding for food

I never would have thought that I could use the term “ant farm” so literally. But Farm 432 is doing just that with their DIY larva growing system, expecting farmers to eat the ‘fruits’ of their labors. While the average American may be hesitant to snack on a centipede or bite a beetle, cuisines in other countries like Thailand, Mexico, and China, all feature insects.

In May this year, a report from the UN encouraged people to eat more insects, noting that over 2 billion people worldwide already used bugs in their diets and could serve as a nutritious alternative to those suffering from malnutrition, particularly children.

Damn guys im worried, I guess were having a much harder time keeping up with the food demand on the planet.


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I never would have thought that I could use the term “ant farm” so literally. But Farm 432 is doing just that with their DIY larva growing system, expecting farmers to eat the ‘fruits’ of their labors. While the average American may be hesitant to snack on a centipede or bite a beetle, cuisines in other countries like Thailand, Mexico, and China, all feature insects.  And in a culture where people are increasingly obsessed with going back to the natural roots of their food, insect farming seems like the next logical progression.

Designer Katharina Unger highly recommends the new system, writing on her website, “Farm 432 enables people to turn against the dysfunctional system of current meat production by growing their own protein source at home. After 432 hours, 1 gram of black soldier fly eggs turn into 2.4 kilogram of larvae protein, larvae that self-harvest and fall clean and ready to eat into a harvest bucket. This scenario creates not only a more sustainable future of food production, but suggests new lifestyles and food cultures.”

Farm 432 - Insect Breeding for food

In May this year, a report from the UN encouraged people to eat more insects, noting that over 2 billion people worldwide already used bugs in their diets and could serve as a nutritious alternative to those suffering from malnutrition, particularly children. So maybe there is something to be said for cooking up creepy-crawlers after all! It may just be a matter of time before we find insects and insect-growing kits supplied at Whole Foods or local farmer’s markets, nestled between raw milk and gluten-free, whole-wheat bread. The photos you see here are the final prototype of the product, and it is not available to purchase (sorry, not going to make it on the holiday list this year), but this is definitely becoming the future for another source of protien. As our population grows, our need for meat will grow, meaning that by year 2050, meat production will need to expand by 50% to meet demand. Keep this story “buzzing” and share it

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